6/18/2019

Additive Manufacturing Systems Enable Near-Contour Cooling

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At Amerimold, TRUMPF Inc. will demonstrate how companies in the mold making industry can take advantage of 3D printing.

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TRUMPF will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

At Amerimold, TRUMPF Inc. will demonstrate how companies in the moldmaking industry can take advantage of 3D printing. TRUMPF’s additive manufacturing systems make it possible to manufacture tools with near-contour cooling. According to the company, its 3D printer series, TruPrint, builds the form layer by layer. This enables cooling channels to run almost parallel to the mold wall. The biggest advantage is that cycle time can be reduced because the mold cools faster. In addition, the components warp less, which increases the quality of the mold. Furthermore, faster cooling in both injection and die casting leads to more homogeneous material properties, which increases the load-bearing capacity of the components.

 

Exhibitor

 

 

TRUMPF Inc.

Booth: 418

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