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Allied Machine & Engineering's T-A Pro Drill Enables Higher Cutting Speeds

IMTS Spark: Allied Machine and Engineering’s T-A Pro drill combines material-specific insert geometries, a redesigned drill body and a coolant-through system to enable penetration rates which run at higher speeds.
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Allied Machine & Engineering T-A Pro drill

Allied Machine and Engineering’s T-A Pro drill combines material-specific insert geometries, a redesigned drill body and a coolant-through system to enable penetration rates which run at higher speeds. Coolant outlets are designed to direct maximum flow to the cutting edge, providing quick heat extraction even at high cutting speeds. Material-specific insert geometries provide effective chip formation, while the drill body’s straight flutes maximize coolant flow and maintain rigidity. 

The T-A Pro drilling system will be available in diameters ranging from 0.4370" to 1.882" (11.1 to 47.80 mm), ideal for stub, 3×D, 5×D, 7×D, 10×D, 12×D, and 15×D hole depths. The drill will be stocked in both imperial and metric shanks, with flat and cylindrical variants. The carbide insert geometries offered initially will cater to the following ISO material classes: steel (P) with AM300 coating; cast iron (K) with TiAlN coating; and non-ferrous (N) with TiCN coating.

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