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7/15/2013 | 1 MINUTE READ

Bolt-on Trunnion Tables for Four-Axis Machining Centers

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The Stallion 9\20 and 9\30 trunnion tables from TrunnionTable.com are designed to optimize the rotary fourth-axis capability of horizontal and vertical machining centers.

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The Stallion 9\20 and 9\30 trunnion tables from TrunnionTable.com are designed to optimize the rotary fourth-axis capability of horizontal and vertical machining centers. The bolt-on trunnions are available in standard-sized models designed for Kurt vises, including the DL675, DL688, DL640 and high-density models. The tables are said to reduce part handling and setups while enabling more parts to be loaded and machined on more sides.

The trunnion fixtures bolt on to a machine’s rotary indexer, enabling milling, drilling, tapping and contouring operations on as many as three sides of a part in a single setup. The trunnions have outboard supports customized to the centerline of a machine’s indexer. The heavily ribbed cast iron construction provides rigidity and durability for repeated long-term use. The tables provide 0.001" flatness over 23" and 0.001" squareness to the faceplate.

The 9\20 9" × 20" model holds a single 6" vise, while the 9\23 9" × 23" model holds a double- or single-station 6" vise. Both feature a through-hole for the vise handle. The 9\23 is available in a double-sided (9\23\DS) version that enables machining on six sides, and a quick-change (9\23\QC) version that provides 60-sec. change-overs with ±0.0005" repeatability. Custom sizes and configurations are also offered.

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