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Bridge-Type Machines Offer Fully Automatic Five-Face Machining

Designed for moldmaking applications, the SF and NF series Vision Wide bridge machining centers available from CNC Systems both offer fully automatic five-face machining.

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Designed for moldmaking applications, the SF and NF series Vision Wide bridge machining centers available from CNC Systems both offer fully automatic five-face machining. Variable automatic hydraulic clamping heads from Vision Wide enable multi-angle cutting.

The SF series features a high-speed spindle and roller guideways offering high repeatability and efficient operation. It is equipped with a 6,000-rpm gear-type spindle and can also be equipped with a built-in 18,000-rpm spindle. Rapid traverse rates are 24 m/min. According to the supplier, the machine’s rigid, lightweight table can achieve high rates of acceleration and deceleration even when fully loaded.

The NF series has a modular design, enabling the machine to be sized for the required market and industry with minimal casting changes. Travels range from 80" to 400" in the X axis and from 90" to 156" in the Y axis. This machining center is equipped with a 6,000-rpm, 35-hp torque motor. It can be equipped with a 10,000-rpm, 40-hp direct-drive spindle, or a 10,000 or 12,000-rpm spindle with a built-in motor.

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