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7/19/2013

Bridge-Type VMC Features Redesigned Spindle Head

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Available from Yama Seiki, the AWEA VP2012-HD is an upgraded version of the current VP2012.

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Available from Yama Seiki, the AWEA VP2012-HD is an upgraded version of the current VP2012. The bridge-type vertical machining center’s redesigned spindle head provides minimal overhang distance between the spindle center line and Z-axis guideway center to reduce deformation. The Z and Y axes feature a heavy-duty machine tool linear guideway offering a frictional coefficient ranging from 0.003 to 0.005 for long-term accuracy. The Z-axis slideway is induction-hardened and finish-ground with a SKC Turcite-coated mating surface.

The machining center’s spindle features continuous/30-min. ratings of 30/35 hp with a two-step gearbox for speeds ranging to 6,000 rpm. Torque is 470 foot-pounds at 387 rpm. The feed system consists of an AC servomotor, high-accuracy ballscrew and special support bearings. External pulse coders are directly connected to the ballscrews for all three axes. The machine is said to minimize stick-slip while damping vibration for greater accuracy. The VMC’s working capacity measures 78.74" × 47.24" × 29.92" with a maximum table load of 9,900 lbs.

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