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5/11/2016

Cabinet Coolers Resist Heat, Corrosion

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Exair’s small, 316 stainless steel cabinet cooler systems keep electrical enclosures cool with 20°F (-7°C) air while resisting heat and corrosion that could adversely affect the internal components.

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Exair’s small, 316 stainless steel cabinet cooler systems keep electrical enclosures cool with 20°F (-7°C) air while resisting heat and corrosion that could adversely affect the internal components. The wear, corrosion and oxidation resistance of the 316 stainless steel ensures long life and maintenance-free operation, the company says. Cooling capacities ranging to 550 Btu/hr. are ideal for small electrical enclosures and heat loads. Models with higher cooling capacities up to 5,600 Btu/hr. for NEMA 12, 4 and 4X enclosures are also available. These cooler systems include an automatic drain filter separator to ensure no moisture passes to the inside of the electrical enclosure. An optional thermostat control minimizes compressed air use and keeps the enclosure at ±2°F of the temperature setting. 

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