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12/26/2017

CAD/CAM Software Targets Specific Processes

Originally titled 'Software Targets Specific Processes'
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Tebis America’s Version 4.0, Release 5 CAD/CAM software targets specific processes such as bottlenecks that can result in long waiting times as well as heavy use of resources and conflicts.

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Tebis America Inc.’s Release 5 of its Version 4.0 CAD/CAM software helps users accelerate their processes without functional restrictions, including machine simulation, working with tool sets, searching for tools in feature machining or exchanging tools in the job manager. With this release, NC programming is now largely automated based on templates with process libraries that enable fast and reliable procedures and processes, the company says. Users can also edit large and complex parts.

According to the company, this software targets specific processes such as bottlenecks that can result in long waiting times as well as heavy use of resources and conflicts. The system is also adapted to optimize the use of all available memory and multi-core technology relying on parallel processing was simultaneously integrated.

The extended parallel processing now used saves time, especially in the calculation of NC programs for re-roughing and parts can be loaded, shaded and saved with time optimization, the company says.

 

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