11/6/2018

Clamping System Mounting Enables Five-Sided Machining

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Carr Lane Roemheld’s DropZero modular zero-point clamping system is said to enable a user to machine a workpiece in one setup.

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Carr Lane Roemheld’s DropZero modular zero-point clamping system is said to enable a user to machine a workpiece in one setup. The system locates, supports and clamps the workpiece from underneath, enabling full machining access to five sides.

Pull studs (round, diamond and floating) are mounted directly to a part, and clamping modules can be mounted to the fixturing plate, elevating the workpiece for machine-spindle clearance. Clamp modules are stackable for added clearance, and are said to fit on all of the company’s ½" and 5/8" modular tooling plates and blocks. According to the company, they can also be used with non-modular tooling.

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