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Collet Chucks Enable Full-Capacity Spindle Operation

The elimination of the drawtube on Lexair’s full-bore, fixed-length, self-contained collet chuck enables full-capacity spindle operation.

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The elimination of the drawtube on Lexair’s full-bore, fixed-length, self-contained collet chuck enables full-capacity spindle operation. The collet chuck can boost spindle capacity as much as 30 percent, and clamping pressure is unaffected by centrifugal force regardless of rpm. An adjustable grip is designed to lightly grasp delicate tubing or clamp tightly for deep rough-cutting operations. The chuck can be used for bar feeding or slugging on main or sub spindles, rotary indexers and machining center tables.

The chuck’s open/close time is less than one-half second, and it provides true dead length clamping with no drawback. A mechanical locking action holds the workpiece, even without air pressure, for failsafe operation. The chuck uses air to release the workpiece rather than secure it, and spring force holds it during machining. Full concentricity adjustment helps maintain accuracy when using master collets with S-type pads.

The full-bore chuck is available in seven models with body diameters from 6" to 14", and bar capacity from 2" to 5.5". It also features direct spindle mounting for A5, A6, A8 and A11 tooling.

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