11/21/2018

Collet Pad Jaws Shorten Cycle Times

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Collet pad top jaw systems from Dillon Manufacturing enable more aggressive machining to shorten cycle times while providing consistent repeatability.

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Dillon Chuck Jaws will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

Collet pad top jaw systems from Dillon Manufacturing enable more aggressive machining to shorten cycle times while providing consistent repeatability. Full contact of gripping surfaces is said to provide a stable grip and enables heavier cuts, while metal-to-metal fits ensure accuracy. Round, hex and square shapes with both smooth and serrated gripping surfaces are available. The line includes collet pad top jaws and W&S solid emergency collet pads, as well as S-type, Gisholt, Jones & Lamson, and Martin types. The collet pads and jaws are especially useful for precision boring, high-speed machining, tapping, drilling and finishing. They are well suited for small-diameter machining of stems, spools, crimp assemblies, manifolds for high pressure air systems, medical parts, miscellaneous fittings, mechanical and transmission components, specialty valves, and more. 

The systems are said to increase a chuck’s range of workholding capabilities, enabling varied part geometries to be machined with the same jaw system. They convert through-hole chucks to hold small bar and tube stock. According to the company, the jaw can be changed quickly, whereas changing the entire chuck may require several hours of labor.

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