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1/7/2019

Collet Pad Top Jaws Expand Chuck Workholding Capabilities

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Collet pad top jaws from Dillon Manufacturing is said to enable aggressive machining to reduce cycle times and provide consistent repeatability.

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Collet pad top jaws from Dillon Manufacturing is said to enable aggressive machining to reduce cycle times and provide consistent repeatability. Full contact of gripping surfaces provides a stable grip and allows heavier cuts, while metal-to-metal fits ensure accuracy, says the company.

Round, hex and square collet pad shapes are available with smooth and serrated gripping surfaces. The line includes collet pad top jaws and W&S solid emergency collet pads, as well as S-type, Gisholt, Jones & Lamson, and Martin collet pad types. Dillon collet pad jaws are said to increase a given chuck’s range of workholding capabilities.

The jaws can convert through-hole chucks to hold small bar and tube stock. According to the company, the jaws can be changed quickly—often in a few minutes—whereas changing the entire chuck may require several hours of labor.

Dillon collet pads and jaws are designed for small-diameter machining of stems, spools, crimp assemblies, manifolds for high-pressure air systems, medical parts, miscellaneous fittings, mechanical and transmission components, specialty valves, and more.

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