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10/24/2016

Compact, Wireless Trunnion Tables Fit Virtually Any Machine

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KME CNC’s compact, wireless five-axis trunnions are said to enable integration on virtually any machine, as the lack of cables frees them up from size restrictions.

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KME CNC’s compact, wireless five-axis trunnions are said to enable integration on virtually any machine, as the lack of cables frees them up from size restrictions. According to the company, they are ideal for VMCs with pallet changers and job shops with high change-over rates.

The trunnions offer 300 foot-pounds of torque on a C drive and as much as 900 foot-pounds on an A drive. Zero backlash means that they can operate for 10,000 hours of continuous use, the company says. The trunnions are made of Meehanite cast iron and billet aluminum covers.

The trunnions enable a three- or four-axis machine to position parts for five-sided machining; increase the operator’s efficiency by reducing setup time; and install easily on existing equipment without additional drive cards. 

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