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9/19/2018

Conformal Cooling Technology Maximizes Cooling Efficiency

Originally titled 'Conformal Cooling Technology Maximizes Cooling Efficiency'
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With so much happening in a busy show year between NPE2018, Amerimold 2018 and IMTS 2018, MoldMaking Technology is revisiting some of the technology that was on display. In case you missed it: DME says that its TruCool Conformal Cooling line provides greater overall cooling coverage with even distribution while maintaining a targeted, consistent temperature and reducing cycle times by as much as 60 percent.

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TruCool Conformal Cooling from DME is designed to maximize cooling efficiency through additive metal manufacturing. This line of conformal cooling products has complex cooling channels conforming to the part-surface geometry. DME says the line provides greater overall cooling coverage with even distribution while maintaining a targeted, consistent temperature and reducing cycle times by as much as 60 percent. At NPE2018, DME focused on three new products and services to the TruCool product and services line. First, DME Design Services builds on decades of moldmaking, mold design, thermal analysis and conformal channel design to provide customers with the most reliable, robust and efficient mold design. Second, DME said its new cooling aftermarket services and equipment provide the ultimate cooling channel cleaning, diagnostics and maintenance. Aftermarket services and maintenance has the ability to troubleshoot, clean and descale both conventional and conformal cooling water channels to maximize the lifespan and efficiency of intricate conformal and conventional cooling through a closed-loop, computer-controlled, automated process. Third, DME announced its new line of TruCool “standard” conformal-cooled components, which includes core pins, gates and sprue bushings.

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