• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
2/27/2019

Cutting Tools Developed to Machine Heat-Resistant Alloys

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Eastec 2019: The AC5000S series of cutting tools, developed by Sumitomo, is designed to aid turning for exotic alloys.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The AC5000S series of cutting tools, developed by Sumitomo, is designed to aid turning for exotic alloys. The AC5015S is for general-purpose machining and the AC5025S is for heavy, interrupted machining. Combining AbsotechBronze coating with a carbide substrate to achieve wear resistance, tools in the AC5000S series are said to ensure stable cutting in heat-resistant alloys like Inconel and Hastelloy. These tools are suited for industries such as aerospace, medical, and oil and gas.

AbsotechBronze PVD coating technology incorporates a heat-resistant, multi-layer, thin-film AlTiSiN structure resulting in crater and flank wear resistance. In addition to the coating, the AC5000S series integrates the company’s recently developed rigid carbide substrate said to demonstrate 20-percent greater toughness compared to conventional grades. The substrate is made with a sintering process, maintaining hardness, improving rigidity and chipping resistance, and reducing notch wear, the company says.

The AC5000S series is said to double tool life while increasing speed and reducing cycle time with difficult-to-cut materials. Recommended chipbreakers available for AC5000S series include EEF for finishing, EEG for medium cutting and EEM for rough/interrupted cutting.

RELATED CONTENT

  • How To Machine Aircraft Titanium: The 8-To-1 Rule For Finishing Walls And Ribs

    Part of a series of articles on more efficient machining of pockets in titanium parts, this article makes the case for a tool with many cutting edges, and describes how best to apply it.  

  • Taking The Fear Out Of Hard Turning

    To make the transition to hard turning, you'll need to switch from carbide to CBN inserts, but that is easier (and more economical) than you might think. It's making the jump to much higher surface speeds that might scare you off. It needn't. Here's why.

  • Tips for Tapping Titanium Alloys

    Creating threaded holes in titanium alloys calls for proper techniques based on an understanding of both the properties of these materials and the peculiarities of the tapping process.

Related Topics

Resources

Thanks for considering a subscription to Modern Machine Shop. We’re sorry to see you go, but if you change your mind, we’d still love to have you as a reader. Just click here.