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Diamond Wheels Produce Carbide Flutes and Periphery Edges

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Norton, a Saint-Gobain brand, has introduced its Paradigm diamond wheels, which feature a new bond designed to deliver high grinding performance on carbide round tools, and periphery grinding on carbide and cermet inserts. The wheels are said to provide fast cycle times, fine cutting edges and reduced cost per part. The wheels are custom-manufactured for user requirements and are available for Anca, Makino, Rollomatic, Star, Walter and other grinding systems.

According to the company, the Paradigm fluting wheels enable one-pass flute grinding at higher feed rates. In periphery grinding of inserts, the wheels are said to create finer edges, achieve longer wheel life and speed production rates.

The wheels are capable of online truing and dressing for lights-out production. Additionally, they are wear- and load-resistant for improved grinding on 6 to 12 percent cobalt, and are said to offer better control over core growth. A higher grain retention and a uniform structure provide a high G ratio (the ratio of material removal rate versus wheel wear) for longer wheel life and higher material removal rates. The wheels’ low specific cutting energy also enables faster grinding with a lower power draw and less burn, the company says.

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