• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
8/22/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Digital Gage Indicators First in Their Size Spec Class

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The L.S. Starrett Co. has introduced a range of digital electronic indicators conforming to true AGD (American Gage Design) Group 1 dimensions, providing the ability to replace traditional mechanical indicating applications in the smallest AGD size specification class.

The L.S. Starrett Co. has introduced a range of digital electronic indicators conforming to true AGD (American Gage Design) Group 1 dimensions, providing the ability to replace traditional mechanical indicating applications in the smallest AGD size specification class. Starrett 2700 electronic indicators are the first digital gages to match true AGD Group 1 dimensions (1.70"/43 mm diameter), according to the company.

These indicators feature a 1.70" diameter, 270-degree rotating bezel, allowing for different user viewing preferences. The gages are available in two displays: a single LCD numeric IQ model (the largest of its class) with low battery warning and programmable ratios, and a numeric/analog AD model showing the two displays simultaneously.

Gages feature a 0.400" (10-mm) travel, accuracy of ±0.0001" (0.002 mm) on the F2715 models and accuracy of ±0.0002" (0.004 mm) on the F2714 models. The gages can store and view as many as 200 readings internally. Stored readings can be downloaded with included software and a USB cable. The batteries can last up to 3,000 hours under typical use. Gages are output-compatible for SPC documentation via cable or wirelessly using a Starrett DataSure data collection device.

Indicators have a 3/8" (0.375") stem with 4-48 thread and are available in four models based on display readout format and resolutions. Gage functions are said to be easy to operate and include: absolute true position, travel reverse, total indicator runout, tolerance settings, floating zero, inch-millimeter conversion, three hold functions (max/min/freeze) and auto off.
Hand holding a crystal ball

We’d rather send you $15 than rely on our crystal ball…

It’s Capital Spending Survey season and the manufacturing industry is counting on you to participate! Odds are that you received our 5-minute Metalworking survey from Modern Machine Shop in your mail or email. Fill it out and we’ll email you $15 to exchange for your choice of gift card or charitable donation. Are you in the U.S. and not sure you received the survey? Contact us to access it.

Help us inform the industry and everybody benefits.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Raising the Bar with Ballbar Testing

    Few manufacturing companies rely on ballbar testing to maintain machine tool accuracy as thoroughly as Silfex. Now, advanced training and a move to a Renishaw QC20-W wireless system have enabled the company to take the benefits of ballbar testing to a higher level.

  • Software Speeds Inspection Documentation

    InspectionXpert software from Extensible CAD Technologies has standardized and automated this manufacturer’s process for ballooning drawings and generating inspection reports.

  • Measuring Part Geometry On The Shop Floor

    Measuring workpiece dimensions is relatively simple for machine operators but measuring workpiece geometry which involves more complex comparisons of part shape to an ideal shape--is now also practical on the shop floor. The gaging equipment for doing this is coming down in price while becoming easier to use.

Resources