• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
2/6/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Dynamic Milling Cutter Insures Even Wear

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The MD133 Supreme milling cutter from Walter USA is designed for dynamic milling and delivers process reliability, particularly during unmanned operation.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The MD133 Supreme milling cutter from Walter USA is designed for dynamic milling and delivers process reliability, particularly during unattended operation. Its productivity comes from a high metal removal rate and a reduction in machining time. The first in the company’s projected line of dynamic milling cutters, it comes in diameters ranging from 0.25" to 0.75" (6 to 20 mm) and cutting lengths ranging to 5×Dc. The line is designed for operating parameters typical of dynamic milling, such as small width of engagement and a high depth of cut facilitated by a large cutting length. The chipbreaker produces short chips even when working with large cutting depths, the company says.

The cutter is available in two  grades. WJ30RD works well for steel and cast iron, while WJ30RA is designed for stainless steels with secondary applications in ISO S and N. Overall, the cutting system is designed for difficult-to-cut materials or unstable conditions due to the machine, workpiece, or clamping.

The cutter makes full use of the entire cutting length, giving it an even wear pattern. Additionally, heat is dissipated via the chip, improving tool edge life. It works well in both high- and low-volume production environments. With its flexibility, the milling cutter is suitable for the diverse range of tasks required for dynamic milling operations. Typical application areas for the company’s dynamic milling cutter line include general engineering, aerospace, energy, and the mold and die industries.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Tool Considerations for High Speed Cutting

    Fast CNC processing and high-pressure coolant contribute to removing metal at dramatic rates. But what should a shop know about cutting tools in high speed machining?

  • Taking The Fear Out Of Hard Turning

    To make the transition to hard turning, you'll need to switch from carbide to CBN inserts, but that is easier (and more economical) than you might think. It's making the jump to much higher surface speeds that might scare you off. It needn't. Here's why.

  • Successful Application Of Ceramic Inserts

    Applying ceramic inserts is not a simple substitution of one cutting tool material for another. There are significant process considerations that shops should examine carefully in order to realize performance and tool life expectations from ceramic inserts. Here's a look at some of the ways they are used.

Resources

Thanks for considering a subscription to Modern Machine Shop. We’re sorry to see you go, but if you change your mind, we’d still love to have you as a reader. Just click here.