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Emag's VLC 350 GT Performs Hard Turning, Grinding in Single Clamping

IMTS Spark: Emag’s VLC 350 GT is designed to perform hard turning and grinding of chucked components, especially in transmission and engine production applications.
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Emag VLC 350 GT

Emag’s VLC 350 GT is designed to perform hard turning and grinding of chucked components, especially in transmission and engine production applications. The machine chucks components ranging to 350 mm (14") in diameter, performing turning and grinding processes progressively in a single clamping. The VLC 350 GT enables traditional hard machining of gears, from hard turning of end faces and pre-turning of the boreholes and outer synchronizing taper, through to finish grinding of those contours. 

The internal grinding spindle with NC swiveling axis allows for processing of components with internal tapers. Loading (and subsequent unloading) is performed at high speeds with a pickup spindle. The machining operation starts with hard turning of the end faces. Depending on the component geometry, inner contours (with one or two tapers), a cylindrical borehole, and the outer synchronizing taper can be pre-turned in the second step. The use of a cylindrical grinding element on the swiveling NC axis makes it possible to machine various internal taper angles. To do this, the grinding spindle is swiveled precisely to the required angle for the specific case. Any required boreholes are also completed this way (with a zero-degree grinding angle). The final step is the grinding of the outer synchronizing taper with the external grinding spindle.

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