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EOS M 300-4 Performs Production-Level Direct Laser Sintering

IMTS Spark: Designed for industrial production of high-quality metal parts, the EOS M 300-4 performs direct metal laser sintering (DMLS).
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EOS M 300-4

Designed for industrial production of high-quality metal parts, the EOS M 300-4 performs direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). The machine is available in multiple configurations with safety and security features that enable digital additive manufacturing (AM). Flexibility in the system allows users to choose the degree of automation that optimizes workflow, but also provides the option to easily ramp up production as demand increases, the company says. The machine’s optimized gas flow design enables full field overlap of the four lasers on the machine. The laser and performance stability ensure consistent part quality over the entire build space, including full coverage of overlaps, EOS says.

The machine provides a work volume of 300 × 300 × 400 mm with a 4 × 400-W Yb fiber laser capable of scan speeds ranging to 7.0 m/sec. It is able to run a range of metal materials, such as nickel alloy, maraging steel, titanium, aluminum and more.

The EOS M 300-4 is capable of running various software offered by the company, including EOSPrint 2, EOS ParameterEditor, EOState Monitoring Suite, EOSConnect Core, EOState Everywhere, and Materialise Magics Metal Package and modules.

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