• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
8/9/2017

Fiber-to-Fiber Coupler Protects Fiber Laser Components

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

A fiber-to-fiber coupler (FFC) from Coherent enables the use of replaceable process fiber optic cables, protecting integral components of the fiber laser, including the feeding fiber, from opto-mechanical damage in harsh industrial processes, which can cause downtime.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

A fiber-to-fiber coupler (FFC) from Coherent enables the use of replaceable process fiber optic cables, protecting integral components of the fiber laser, including the feeding fiber, from opto-mechanical damage in harsh industrial processes, which can cause downtime. It enables the use of a separate fiber interface, which can be exchanged in minutes when damaged. The FFC is an eye-safe, stand-alone, water-cooled photonic component that handles 12 kW of laser power and can couple fibers of different core diameters, as well as commonly used connector interfaces (QB, QD and Q5). It incorporates DGUV-certified safety electronics, and is an extension of the feeding fiber interlock circuit. It also includes integrated sensors, monitored and controlled by CANopen communication, with threshold values which can enable or disable the interlock circuitry.

RELATED CONTENT

  • A Waterjet Machining Center that Fits

    At first, abrasive waterjet machines were naturally at home in the fabricating shop. Today, certain models resemble a typical, fully enclosed CNC machine and they fit well in a machining job shop setting.

  • What it Takes for Oilfield Success

    Hunt and Hunt’s president says adopting turn/mill machines was one of the most challenging endeavors his 55-year-old shop ever undertook. He also says it’s the best thing the shop could have done to become more efficient at contract work.

  • The Promise of Waterjet Technology for Micromachining

    The potential benefits of using waterjet technology to produce parts or part features smaller than 300 microns are compelling. Developers and researchers are getting close to breaking the barriers that stand in the way of micromachining in the 150- to 200-micron range and below.

Related Topics

Resources