Five-Axis Aluminum Machining Centers

Makino’s next generation of MAG series five-axis machinery, the A7, provides increased accuracy and reduced cycle times for large complex aluminum monolithic parts for aerospace structural applications. The A7 is designed with extended X-, Y- and Z-axis travels of 276" × 99" × 40" (7,000 mm × 2,500 mm × 1,000 mm) to accommodate parts as large as 276" × 79" × 28" (7,000 mm × 2,000 mm × 700 mm) that weigh as much as 11,024 lbs (5,000 kg).

Makino’s next generation of MAG series five-axis machinery, the A7, provides increased accuracy and reduced cycle times for large complex aluminum monolithic parts for aerospace structural applications.

The A7 is designed with extended X-, Y- and Z-axis travels of 276" × 99" × 40" (7,000 mm × 2,500 mm × 1,000 mm) to accommodate parts as large as 276" × 79" × 28" (7,000 × 2,000× 700 mm) that weigh as much as 11,024 lbs (5,000 kg). The machine’s extended Z-axis travel provides increased side-face machining efficiency for improved productivity and capability. New linear motors in the X axis produce thrust forces of 30,000 N for acceleration rates ranging to 0.5G, further increasing productivity through reduced cycle times.

Additionally, the machine features the company’s Volumetric Accuracy Compensation technology for improved tool tip positioning accuracy. This provides in-process tool-tip corrections for sustained dynamic accuracy in complex 3D geometries in parts as large as 7 m. The machine is also equipped with a 33,000-rpm, HSK-F80 spindle with high-power output of 107 hp. At peak power output, its spindle can produce chip removal rates ranging to 5,400 cc/min. Bellow covers provide thermal isolation, preventing any hot coolant and chip contact with critical machine features. An optional thermal chamber can also be purchased for additional thermal protection.

The machine is equipped with a standard 60-tool capacity ATC for unattended machining capabilities, and it can be integrated with an automatic pallet changer system for continuous operation. For extended periods of unattended operation, the machine can be integrated with an automatic pallet transfer and storage system in a Makino Machining Complex (MMC). This automation system assigns work and initiates operations automatically, maximizing spindle utilization for increased productivity.

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