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3/20/2014

Gage Series for Internal Threaded Products

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OSG Tap & Die now offers its thread gage series with the NIST traceable gage certification option.

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OSG Tap & Die now offers its thread gage series with the NIST traceable gage certification option. The company says all of its thread gages comply with the ANSI manufacturing standards, and the short-form certificate of conformance ships with all standard gage sets. The long-form certificate of calibration is available upon request for a standard Go/No Go gage set.

The thread-limit gages are constructed of high speed steel and hardened to 64 HRc to resist wear, and are designed to inspect pitch diameter and functional thread for internal threaded products. The gages consist of Go gages that can be screwed in and passed through by hand, and No Go gages that are screwed in no more than two revolutions. The gages are sold as Go/No Go sets with handles, and are available in standard 2B and 6H classes of fit.

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