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Hardness Testers Feature Electronic Control

IMTS 2018: Mitutoyo’s HR-530-series Rockwell hardness testers includes the HR-530 and HR-530L

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Mitutoyo’s HR-530-series Rockwell hardness testers includes the HR-530 and HR-530L. The HR-530 accommodates specimens as tall as 250 mm and as deep as 150 mm. The HR-530L accommodates specimens as tall as 395 mm and as deep as 150 mm.

The series features electronic control giving it capabilities for Rockwell, Rockwell Superficial, Rockwell testing of plastics (A & B) and Light Force Brinell hardness testing. All models test hardness of an inside ring wall without cutting the ring. The minimum diameter that can be tested is 34 mm, but inside diameters as small as 22 mm can be tested using the optional 5-mm diamond indenter.

A color touch screen displays results of statistical calculations and graphic functions which can be stored as text data. The testers feature a numeric display of statistical analysis results, including maximum and minimum values, mean value, and graphic display of X-Bar & R control charts and histograms required for hardness evaluation.

A nose-type indenter enables measurement on a flat-top surface of a specimen and the inside surface of a cylindrical specimen. Pressing the foot switch or the start button enables continuous testing when testing multiple workpieces with the same height.

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