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5/29/2008

High Speed VMC For Non-Ferrous Materials

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The M10 Power VMC offers a 40,000-rpm, 3-kW, high-frequency spindle for machining non-ferrous materials such as plastics and aluminum alloys. The VMC’s toolchanger can store 11 small mills and drills with diameters ranging from 0.002" to 0.375". It has an XYZ work envelope of 40" × 28.5" × 9.25" and is suited for a variety of machining applications in the aerospace, electronics and medical industries.   The machine features rigid steel construction with either a solid granite table or a concrete polymer table to enable precise, low-vibration motion. It also features a high-efficiency cooling and lubrication system that uses only the fluid it requires as well as a chip disposal system that can be adjusted to accommodate different production volumes. Intelligent sensors monitor all operating states of the mechanics, and the PC-based control system can automatically compensate for tolerance variations.

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