4/27/2009

High/Low Chucking

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 Northfield Precision announces the development of two methods of high/low chucking: “on the fly,” and “cycle interrupt. ” Using a proprietary valve system, delicate parts can be rough machined and finished in one chucking. The cycle starts with the jaws clamping at high pressure for roughing, then dropping down to low pressure for finishing.

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Northfield Precision announces the development of two methods of high/low chucking: “on the fly,” and “cycle interrupt.” Using a proprietary valve system, delicate parts can be rough machined and finished in one chucking. The cycle starts with the jaws clamping at high pressure for roughing, then dropping down to low pressure for finishing.

Models include through-hole, high speed and quick-change. They are available in SAE or metric units and in sizes from 3″ to 18″ (76 mm to 457 mm). The company says that accuracies of 0.001″ to 0.00001″ are possible.

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