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5/12/2014

HSM Built to Handle High-Speed Machining

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Designed to handle the rigors of high-speed machining, Hurco's VMX42HSi high-speed mill offers direct-drive servos, an 18,000-rpm integral spindle and X-Y-Z travels measuring 42" × 24" × 24".

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Designed to handle the rigors of high-speed machining, Hurco's VMX42HSi high-speed mill offers direct-drive servos, an 18,000-rpm integral spindle and X-Y-Z travels measuring 42" × 24" × 24". The durable milling machine features large linear rails that are strategically spaced and mounted to a machined shoulder for increased rigidity. The rails are wedge-locked to the fram to reduce vibration. Double-nut, pre-tensioned ballscrews are anchored at both ends to increase accuracy and rigidity. The automatic toolchanger supports HSK tooling and offers a chip-to-chip time of 4.5 sec. Air-over-oil spindle lubrication distributes oil evenly and prevents bearings from grease starvation, the company says.

The machine is equipped with Hurco’s UltiMotion motion control system, said to reduce cycle time as much as 30 percent while simultaneously improving the surface finish quality of molds. The system uses software algorithms for motion planning instead of conventional hardware, which means it optimizes look-ahead as much as 10,000 blocks, Hurco says. According to the company, the integrated control is optimized for the advanced tool paths generated by CAM systems with a 64-GB solid state drive, 2 GB of memory, a 2-GHz dual-core Intel processor and processing speed as fast as 2,277 bps.

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