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2/28/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

Indexable Drill Inserts Break Chips for Efficient Holemaking

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Eastec 2019: Allied Machine & Engineering will showcase the 4TEX indexable carbide insert drilling system engineered for optimal chip formation and evacuation in holemaking processes.

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Allied Machine & Engineering will showcase the 4TEX indexable carbide insert drilling system engineered for optimal chip formation and evacuation in holemaking processes. The drill is said to outperform other standard drills by delivering higher penetration rates in light-duty machines. 4TEX is designed to excel in challenging applications such as interrupted cuts or drilling in high-temperature alloys and stainless steels, especially when making shallow 2×D, 3×D, and 4×D holes in the 0.472" to 1.850" (12- to 47-mm) range.

The 4TEX drill’s design bolsters its core strength, thereby improving hole straightness. The flute space of the internal cutting edge side, where chips often cluster, is 1.6 times larger than typical IC drills, the company says. Dual twisted coolant outlets improve penetration rates by enhancing coolant flow and therefore also chip evacuation.

The insert geometries are optimized for wear resistance and are available in geometry/coating combinations for all ISO materials including steel, stainless steel, high-temperature alloys, nonferrous and iron. The insert shape is designed to improve surface finish, hole quality and penetration rates while eliminating issues from chips winding around the tool.

Drills are stocked in both imperial and metric shanks with standard fractional diameters, as well as in diameters of every ½ mm up to 26 mm and every 1 mm up to 47 mm.

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