8/17/2018

Indexable Inserts Turn Threads in Tight Spaces

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The A60 and AG60 Walter Cut MX indexable grooving inserts for small- to medium-pitch threads deliver multiple advantages.

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Walter has introduced the A60 and AG60 inserts for small- to medium-pitch threads. Like the company’s existing MX geometries, the new inserts are designed to improve tool life, surface quality and process reliability.

The inserts, which have four cutting edges, can create 60 degree partial-profile external threads in a range of pitches from 6 to 48 TPI (0.5 to 3.0 mm). The company says the product is suited to thread-turning in tight spaces. The insert seat pockets enable inserts with different thicknesses (for example, sizes 2 and 4) and different functions (such as grooving or threading) can be used in the same holder.

The system is suitable for all materials. It can handle insert widths between 0.03-0.13" (0.8 and 3.25 mm) and cutting depths ranging to 0.24" (6 mm). Because of its self-aligning tangential clamping, the insert is pressed against the contact points when the screw is tightened. A dowel pin helps with accuracy of fit.

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