• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
8/5/2008 | 1 MINUTE READ

Intelligent Lifting Devices Feature Modular Design And Onboard Diagnostics

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The company’s line of G-Force Q and iQ intelligent lifting devices includes two new capabilities. The designs are available in 165- and 330-lb (75- and 150-kg) capacities, in addition to the existing 660-lb (300-kg) capacity. The units’ technology combines the responsiveness and flexibility of a human operation wit

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

The company’s line of G-Force Q and iQ intelligent lifting devices includes two new capabilities. The designs are available in 165- and 330-lb (75- and 150-kg) capacities, in addition to the existing 660-lb (300-kg) capacity. The units’ technology combines the responsiveness and flexibility of a human operation with the mechanical power of a machine, the company says. It is designed to be more precise than a hoist, to be more responsive than an air balancer and to make a user’s workforce more productive by increasing efficiency and enabling the workforce to safely and easily perform complex lifting and handling tasks.

According to the company, the units’ new design elements and software features improve both function and reliability, including a modular design, onboard diagnostics and a new handle design. The modular design is intended for easier retrofitting so that users can add on and modify to meet the changing needs of their applications. The onboard diagnostics are said to keep the units operating at peak performance. Preventative maintenance indicators are programmed to alert maintenance people when regular wear items like wire ropes need replacement or when the unit is due for inspection. The redesigned handle is said to be more ergonomic and feature a standard LCD display to better communicate information such as operation modes, programming menus, fault codes, diagnostic information and weight readout.

Hand holding a crystal ball

We’d rather send you $15 than rely on our crystal ball…

It’s Capital Spending Survey season and the manufacturing industry is counting on you to participate! Odds are that you received our 5-minute Metalworking survey from Modern Machine Shop in your mail or email. Fill it out and we’ll email you $15 to exchange for your choice of gift card or charitable donation. Are you in the U.S. and not sure you received the survey? Contact us to access it.

Help us inform the industry and everybody benefits.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Workholding In A Vacuum

    An aerospace machine shop meets a special need by using a vacuum chuck.

  • Pins: The Alternative To Parallels

    These vise jaws use protruding, mechanical pins to repeatedly support workpieces either horizontally or at angles. They are said to allow quicker setups than conventional parallels.

  • A Study Of The Steady Rest

    When the length and stiffness of a workpiece make it difficult to machine without distorting or deflecting the part, many manufacturers turn to the steady rest as a workpiece support device. This is especially true for long axles, shafts and similar parts used in automotive or heavy equipment applications, and in oil drilling components. The most common application is to support a workpiece during turning or milling and, increasingly, during secondary operations such as ID drilling, boring and producing end face bolthole patterns.

Related Topics

Resources