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4/1/2013

Large-Bore Lathe Handles Rough and Fine Turning

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Chevalier’s FB-510MC slant-bed lathe is designed for pipe-threading applications required by gas, oil and related industries.

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Chevalier’s FB-510MC slant-bed lathe is designed for pipe-threading applications required by gas, oil and related industries. The machine features dual-chuck capability with a spindle bore diameter of 12.5". A three-speed gearbox provides horsepower for large-diameter, heavy-duty cutting. The slant bed lathes are stable, highly accurate machines capable of rough- and fine-turning operations, the company says.

The 45-degree slant-bed design is comprised of single-piece Meehanite cast iron with wide-span, ribbed box structure. Box guideways are 5" × 3.15". Maximum swing diameter is 44.7", and cutting diameter is 34.6". The 3,000-rpm, 15-hp turret is equipped with a 200-mm-thick disk and hydraulic clamping for cutting stability in rough turning environments. Features include a 12-station BMT85 hydraulic turret and 1.25" OD shank. A 60-hp spindle motor features a three-stage gearbox and generates 4,135 Nm of torque for cutting large-diameter workpieces or difficult materials. The FANUC 0i-TD control features a 10.4" LCD color screen and a built-in Manual Guide i Conversational program. A live quill with MT6 rotate center also is standard.
 

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