Large Machining Center Has Retractable Roof for Part Loading

C.R. Onsrud’s Compact High Rail five-axis machining center has a larger work envelope and higher load capacity for more demanding machining applications, such as those encountered in the aerospace, automotive, medical and defense industries.

C.R. Onsrud’s Compact High Rail five-axis machining center has a larger work envelope and higher load capacity for more demanding machining applications, such as those encountered in the aerospace, automotive, medical and defense industries. Options include a retractable roof for easier material loading, large-capacity toolchangers and multiple spindle configurations to meet various machining needs. The machine features a 15-hp, 24,000-rpm spindle with 24- and 33-hp options.

The company offers two machine configurations in this style, the F148CH and F148CH W10, with X, Y and Z axes measuring 84" × 144" × 53 and 120" × 144" × 53", respectively. Custom sizes are also available.

Other features include a FANUC 31i or Osai Open CNC; a 15-position tool rack, with optional larger-capacity tool chains; vacuum clamping, with optional fixture plate or T-slot tables; and a chip pan or chip conveyor. Options include inkjet part marking, automatic tool measurement, robotics integration, continuous C axis and linear scale feedback. 

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