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11/2/2017

Laser Metal Deposition Machine Uses Blue Laser

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The blue wavelength laser is said to increase process speeds and work with more materials than industry-standard infrared lasers.

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Formalloy has released its L-series laser metal deposition machine with an inert gas build chamber, scientific monitoring capability and a blue wavelength laser. It can be used to 3D print, repair and clad metallic parts in a range of materials with speed and accuracy, the company says. The first machine of this type is complete and is slated to be installed at University of California - San Diego's Department of Nanotechnology.

Blue lasers can process materials that infrared lasers cannot process or can only process in low yields. The absorption of the L-series machine’s blue laser is said to be between 3 and 20 times better than the industry-standard infrared wavelength, resulting in process speeds that are between 2 and 10 times faster. The spot size of the laser is 5 times smaller than infrared lasers for precision, resolution and high finish quality. 

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