• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
9/12/2017

Lathes Feature Modular Design

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Gear Expo 2017: Emag will feature its modular VL and VT series for chucked components, including its VL 4 machine, designed for medium- to large-batch runs on standard machining platforms.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Emag will feature its modular VL and VT series for chucked components, including its VL 4 machine, designed for medium- to large-batch runs on standard machining platforms. Machining is performed on four axes at a maximum speed of 6,000 rpm, employing two turrets with twelve tool stations each, equipped with turning or driven tools.

The machines feature an integrated automation system for transporting workpieces, which is said reduce cycle time and increase productivity when combined with self-loading pickup spindles. The service units are designed to be within reach so operators can access them for easy maintenance.

While standard lathes are commonly used for gear blanks, a range of technologies can be incorporated into the machines, including turning, grinding, hobbing, chamfering, induction hardening and laser welding.

The company will also show technology for laser welding to lightweight automotive components and electro-chemical machining (ECM) to broach and deburr.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Dispelling Small Machine Shop Myths

    Many job shops start in a garage with a used mill and a manual lathe. The owners of this Utah job shop took a different tack. Along the way to a very successful business, they've debunked a bunch of myths commonly held about job shops.

  • Milling with Air

    ... not to mention grinding with air. Thanks to high speed spindles powered by shop air, this job shop expands the work its VMCs can do.

  • Four Types Of Five-Axis Machining Centers

    Different machines offer different approaches to rotary travel, and each design has its own strengths. Here's how they compare.

Resources