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Lathes Use Low-Frequency Vibration to Avoid Chip Problems

PMTS 2017: The popular Citizen Cincom L20 sliding-headstock lathes from Marubeni are now available with low-frequency vibration (LFV). LFV is said to avoid the problem of spiraling chips, chip entanglement and built-up edges.

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The popular Citizen Cincom L20 sliding-headstock lathes from Marubeni are now available with low-frequency vibration (LFV). LFV is said to avoid the problem of spiraling chips, chip entanglement and built-up edges. Benefits include increased cutting tool life, reduced heat generation and reduced power consumption. LFV technology can handle a range of machining shapes and materials and is ideal for cutting difficult-to-cut materials, increasing throughput and improving part accuracy. In LFV cutting, “air cutting” time prevents the machining temperature from rising, prolonging tool life and providing relief from various problems caused by chips.

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