Machine-Ready Blanks

According to the company, its machine-ready blanks reduce overall part costs. They can be loaded directly into the machine without prep operations, which include sawing, grinding, flattening or squaring.  Additionally, machine-ready blanks are said to require less time for adjusting setups and fixture offsets.

According to the company, its machine-ready blanks reduce overall part costs. They can be loaded directly into the machine without prep operations, which include sawing, grinding, flattening or squaring. Additionally, machine-ready blanks are said to require less time for adjusting setups and fixture offsets. By ending prep time and minimizing setup time, operators and machines are more productive, which increases throughput capacity, the company says.

Tolerance is guaranteed as close as ±0.0005" dimensionally and ±0.0002" flatness, squareness and parallelism. The blanks are processed using double-disc grinding, blanchard grinding, duplex milling and sub operations such as flattening, deburring and surface improvement.

The company’s machine-ready blanks and finish-machined parts are available in virtually all material including aluminum; stainless; brass; copper; titanium; plastics; high temperature and nickel alloys; carbon steels and tubes; tool steel; controlled expansion alloys; ceramics; spring steel; and ductile iron.

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