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4/25/2017

Machining Center’s Ladder-Type Cross Rails Prevents Vertical-Axis Deformation

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Eastec 2017: Takumi says its H10 double-column machining center’s rigidity and thermal stability make it well-suited for parts that require fast processing, high precision and quality surface finish.

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Takumi says its H10 double-column machining center’s rigidity and thermal stability make it well-suited for parts that require fast processing, high precision and quality surface finish. With a ladder design on the bridge and a Big-Plus spindle, the machine is ideal for die/mold, aerospace and other high-speed applications, the company says.

The H10 has X-, Y- and Z-axis travels measuring 40" × 27" × 19"; a 30-station swing-arm automatic toolchanger; an in-line, direct-drive, high-speed Big-Plus spindle; and 30-bar (435-psi) CTS and linear scales. The ladder design of the cross rails provides rigid support for the saddle and head and prevents deformation in the vertical axis, the company says, thus enabling faster speeds and accurate 3D surfacing. The proximity of the spindle to the bridge casting reduces overhang. The machine’s one-piece base absorbs the thrust force of the table, preventing the column distortion typical of C-frame machines. Roller-type rails on all axes increase rigidity and enable high table loads.

All H-series machines are equipped with the FANUC 31i-MB control and drive system, which executes at nanometer resolution for maximum precision and the smoothest contoured surface finish quality.

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