Metalworking Fluids Omit Formaldehyde-Releasing Biocides

Chemetall’s semi-synthetic Tech Cool metalworking fluids are formulated without the use of the triazine or other formaldehyde-releasing biocides.

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Chemetall’s semi-synthetic Tech Cool metalworking fluids are formulated without the use of the triazine or other formaldehyde-releasing biocides.

To inhibit bacterial growth, the company says it uses high-grade raw materials, sanitary maintenance practices and fluid control, and advanced micro-emulsion technologies. The products are said to feature high lubricity, enhanced corrosion control and increased tramp oil rejection, even in high-pressure applications. They are compatible with ferrous and aluminum alloys, and can be used in stand-alone machine sumps and central coolant systems. The fluids are stable in hard water, and they are low foaming and residue-free. They also are suitable for recycling operations, the company says. 

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