7/19/2018

Milling Tools Resist Chatter, Pullout

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

IMTS 2018: New cutting tool geometries for Haimer’s Power Mill and Duo-Lock lines include designs for aluminum and mold steels.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Connect at

Haimer USA will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

New geometries for Haimer’s Power Mill line of solid carbide end mills and and Duo-Lock line of modular milling heads include designs for aluminum and mold steels. Unequal flute and helix designs provide chatter-free machining. The company’s tools are made from K20-K40-grade fine-grain carbide.

The latest tools include two- and three-flute end mills for aluminum, which are available in solid carbide or as a modular interface (Duo-Lock),  four- to 10-flute end mills for working in steel, and various specialized cutting tools. Special tools include a multifunction chamfer spotting tool, four- and five-flute roughing mills for steel, a quadrant end mill, and ball nose end mills for steel and aluminum. All are available as solid carbide end mills or Duo-Lock interfaces.The company also offers the Basic Mill line

of solid carbide end mills and Duo-Lock milling heads for roughing, finishing and drilling. All tools are available with the optional Safe-Lock anti-pullout system.

RELATED CONTENT

  • 10 Tips for Titanium

    Simple process considerations can increase your productivity in milling titanium alloys.

  • Successful Application Of Ceramic Inserts

    Applying ceramic inserts is not a simple substitution of one cutting tool material for another. There are significant process considerations that shops should examine carefully in order to realize performance and tool life expectations from ceramic inserts. Here's a look at some of the ways they are used.

  • Tips for Tapping Titanium Alloys

    Creating threaded holes in titanium alloys calls for proper techniques based on an understanding of both the properties of these materials and the peculiarities of the tapping process.

Resources