9/25/2018

Modular Vise Clamps Two Workpieces

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The Hoffmann Group has released a module for its Garant Xpent five-axis vise.

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The Hoffmann Group has released a module for its Garant Xpent five-axis vise. The center jaw, which can be optionally fitted to the base rail, enables users to clamp two workpieces with just one vise and process these parts in a single operation. This enables efficient clamping strategies that lead to an increase in productivity.

The vise is based on a modular design concept. Clamping modules, base rails and spindles can be individually combined, and the convex clamping modules can be turned 180 degrees. The newly developed center jaw offers another bonus in terms of flexibility. It is immediately available as an accessory for sizes 0 to 1S. It will soon be available in sizes 1 and 2. The existing range of attachment rails, each with two clamping stages, is fully compatible with the new center jaw.

The vise provides clamping force as great as 40 kN and 90 Nm of torque. It is available in three different heights and two widths. Base rails are available in lengths of 360 to 1,050 mm. The 1S size was specificaly developed for three- and five-axis machines with small spindle gearboxes.

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