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Multi-Sensor Measuring Machine Available in More Sizes

Smart Manufacturing Experience 2018: The Zeiss O-Inspect multi-sensor measuring machine has become more customizable and now provides more flexibility for a wider range of applications.

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The Zeiss O-Inspect multi-sensor measuring machine has become more customizable and now provides more flexibility for a wider range of applications. Thanks to the new additions to the line, users now have a greater selection of machine sizes, configurations and options. The contact-optical measuring machine line now offers several sizes, load capacities and contact probes, all with increased dynamics and the option of adding a chromatic focus sensor at any time. 

The machine can be used for a  range of activities including the measurement of dental implants, tiny vehicle parts and sensitive smartphone components. For workpieces that are either too small or delicate, or when large quantities have to be measured, users can switch on the camera sensor. For 3D characteristics, the benefits of the contact sensor come into play. The chromatic focus sensor is said to close the gap between the contact and camera sensors.

Users are no longer limited to two system sizes. The smallest model measures 300 × 200 × 200 mm, giving it a measuring range of 12 cubic decimeters. The next size up measures 500 × 400 × 300 mm or 60 cubic decimeters. Zeiss also offers an 863 model for large or heavy workpieces or large pallets which hold many parts. It features a measuring range of 800 × 600 × 300 mm, or 144 cubic decimeters.

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