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Multitasking Machine’s Dual Five-Axis Heads Have Dedicated ATCs

The Niles-Simmons-Hegenscheidt (NSH) Group introduces it N30MC multitasking machine for aerospace parts manufacturing, with a rigid five-axis design capable of turning, milling, drilling, grinding and measuring.

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The Niles-Simmons-Hegenscheidt (NSH) Group introduces it N30MC multitasking machine for aerospace parts manufacturing, with a rigid five-axis design capable of turning, milling, drilling, grinding and measuring. This machine is ideal for incorporation in high-precision and complex, automated, closed-door machining cells, particularly when processing difficult-to-machine nickel-based materials, titanium and powdered alloys. According to the company, the N30MC can consistently produce workpiece diameters within ±2 microns in a closed-door process.

The machine has a main spindle and counterspindle for part handover, enabling complete machining of both sides of the workpiece. It can be equipped with dual five-axis heads for simultaneous machining of workpieces in the main and counterspindle, reducing cycle time and the need for operator intervention. Each five-axis head uses a dedicated automatic toolchanger (ATC). Each ATC can hold as many as 144 tools to facilitate uninterrupted production.

Additional features include automatic grinding including wheel dressing; process monitoring for controlling potential deviations during machining; Hydropol concrete slant bed with a central boxway guide system for optimum damping; a trunnion-supported tool spindle; and a large-cross-section Z slide for maximum rigidity. An integrated Protection Collision System (PCS) avoids collisions during manual setup and automatic mode. Additionally, the multitasking machining center is equipped with Renishaw touch and scanning probes, enabling the reproduction of measuring result diameters within 1 micron, the company says. 

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