2/28/2013

Non-Contact Measurement System for Cylindrical Components

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Mectron Inspection Systems’ First Scan 150R is a non-contact, fully automatic precision measuring system designed for cylindrical components.

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Mectron Inspection Systems’ First Scan 150R is a non-contact, fully automatic precision measuring system designed for cylindrical components. The First Scan 150R uses a telecentric backlight illuminator and a high-resolution line-scan camera to produce the silhouette of the part to be inspected. During the scanning process, a calibration cone (which is incorporated into the part holder) provides the basis for all measurements to be provided automatically by the machine.

The measurement system scans the part using two separate servo drives. The first scans the part on the linear axis for geometric tolerances of features such as diameter, width, radii, angles, threads and more. The second rotates and scans the part on the radial axis and inspects for concentricity, flats, hex, perpendicularity and cylindricity, providing 360-degree capabilities.

The First Scan 150R is capable of inspecting parts ranging to 35 mm in diameter and lengths of 150 mm.
 

 

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