4/10/2015

Pneumatic Vise Designed for CMM Inspection

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The Rapid-Loc pneumatic vise from Phillips Precision holds workpieces for CMM inspection with soft jaws that can be customized to hold virtually any part.

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Phillips Precision will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

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The Rapid-Loc pneumatic vise from Phillips Precision holds workpieces for CMM inspection with soft jaws that can be customized to hold virtually any part. Designed to take advantage of a CMM’s air supply, the vise’s regulated air pressure can produce just enough clamping force to hold delicate parts or, if needed, generate as much as 150 lbs. The black anodized aluminum pneumatic vise offers a 2.5" × 3.5" footprint and 0.06" travel and comes with one set of machinable aluminum soft jaws. The vise can mount on the company’s Loc-N-Load inspection setup using quick-swap fixture plates for fast, accurate and repeatable setups. Rapid-Loc can also be mounted on existing CMM breadboards and is securable with standard or metric thread screws.

Phillips Precision also offers a workholding kit for Vision Inspection that complements its Open-Sight, fast-swap fixture plate system. The kit includes Trigger-Finger and Trigger-Point hold downs, a clear acrylic platform for extending work out over the viewing area, hole adjusters, Sliding Stop and Spring-Loc stops and clamps for holding work on an optical stage.

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