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12/13/2006

Protection For Lathe Operators

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Designed for lathes and similar machines, Danray Products’ heavy-duty lathe chuck shields provide a barrier between the chuck and the workpiece and the operator. The 3/16" polycarbonate shields also deflect chips, coolant and other particles. They locate out of the way on the machine to allow changing the chuck, using the chuck key and changing the workpiece. The operator can move the shields in and out of position without reaching over the chuck, and the shields will not interfere with lathes that have a rear guard/backsplash.

 

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