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12/11/2018

Quick-Change Jaw System Adapts to Various Jaw Lock Dimensions

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Huron Machine Products has released the System 3 quick-change jaw system, improving changeover time and minimizing cost for the chucking of various small and large parts.

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Huron Machine Products has released the System 3 quick-change jaw system, improving changeover time and minimizing cost for the chucking of various small and large parts.

The System 3 quick-change base jaws bolt the chuck like a standard top jaw. The base jaw is made out of 8620 steel case, hardened and ground to assure durability. The system allows for the use of an existing chuck, because the base jaws can adapt to any jaw lock dimension for any foreign or domestic power chuck.

The system uses replaceable jaw inserts that slip on and off a base jaw that can be set by tightening or loosening an allen screw. Jaw inserts are offered in hard, soft and full-grip inserts for chucks from 6" to 40". Repeatability is guaranteed to 0.001 or to a chuck’s original manufacturer specifications.

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