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7/20/2018

Rack-Based CNC Series Improves Machine Performance

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IMTS 2018: Mitsubishi Electric Automation expands its MELSEC iQ-R automation platform with the introduction of the C80 series CNC.

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Mitsubishi Electric Automation expands its MELSEC iQ-R automation platform with the introduction of the C80 series of CNCs. The rack-based controller features a CNC-dedicated CPU designed to improve its performance.

CNC functions and drive units enable high-speed, accurate machining, while a high-speed system bus provides large-capacity data communication. These features combine to reduce cycle times and increase productivity, according to the company.

The controller suits rotary dial machines, production machines using multiple processes and automotive transfer lines.  According to the company, it provides a flexible system configuration, user-friendly functionality, safety measures compliant with global standards and low maintenance requirements.

It also enables control of all CNC CPUs on a PLC rack. Three CPUs control up to 21 system components and 48 axes, making it suitable for high-axis-count applications. In addition, the controller can communicate with any module used in a rack-based solution. 

Communication speed between the CNC and drive contributes to improved system responsiveness.

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