11/17/2016 | 1 MINUTE READ

Rotor Milling Machines Efficiently Produce Helical Screw Profiles, Worm Shafts

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Holroyd EX-series CNC rotor milling machines are designed for high speed, precision and reliability.

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Holroyd EX-series CNC rotor milling machines are designed for high speed, precision and reliability. The EX range begins with the 1EX, a machine capable of milling helical components ranging to 150 mm in diameter, and offers stepped increases in capability, right up to the 8EX rotor miller for parts ranging to 850 mm in diameter. Additionally, a “special order” 10EX machine is also available for components exceeding 1 m in diameter. Various custom models are available.

EX machines cut a full-depth groove by traversing the cutting tool through the material at the relevant helix angle while simultaneously rotating the component in the C axis. Accurate synchronization between the axes is maintained via the CNC, with digital drive technology controlling all axis movements. The cutting head is able to remove so much material in one step because the majority of heat generated is transferred to the chips, the company says; these are then removed from inside the machine by means of a conveyor system.

The flexibility of EX-series rotor milling machines means they are equally efficient at producing complex components with helical screw profiles as they are at producing gear parts such as worm shafts. Holroyd says that in all manufacturing environments these machines can improve productivity through a combination of high-speed operation, powerful menu-driven touchscreen CNC programming, quick-change tooling, high-power spindles and rigidity.

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