| 1 MINUTE READ

Rough-Boring Tools Address Vibration, Chip Breaking

Sandvik Coromant introduces its CoroBore rough-boring tools, which are designed to address vibration, chip breaking and process security while delivering high productivity.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Sandvik Coromant introduces its CoroBore rough-boring tools, which are designed to address vibration, chip breaking and process security while delivering high productivity. The tools are available in single, twin and triple edge. The tools are said to offer high performance in ISO P (steel), M (stainless steel), K (cast iron), N (nonferrous), S (heat-resistant super alloy and titanium) and ISO H (hardened steel).

To support these tools, the company has also introduced CoroBore 111 four-edged inserts, which are designed to provide optimized grade selection, good chip-formation qualities and increased tool life.

The CoroBore BR20 twin-edge tool has a differential pitch to reduce pitch vibration and enable use at longer overhangs and larger cut depths. It enables built-in step-boring without the need for an extra shim, and coolant nozzles which handle coolant pressure ranging to 70 bar (1,015 psi) to evacuate chips. The BR20 is available with vibration-damping Silent Tools technology for long overhangs or where additional stability is needed, and is said to increase cut depth while maintaining security. According to the company, the BR20 can increase overhang by 30 percent compared to its DuoBore tool and tool life by 75 percent.

The single-edge BR10 is said to be ideal for back boring with its back-boring slide and cover. The three-edge BR30 has a short, rigid design and differential pitch for high productivity and low vibration.

These tools can be combined with the company’s Capto and EG modular systems for flexibility. Each solution is available separately or as part of a complete tool assembly kit.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Composites Machining for the F-35

    Lockheed Martin’s precision machining of composite skin sections for the F-35 provides part of the reason why this plane saves money for U.S. taxpayers. That machining makes the plane compelling in ways that have led other countries to take up some of the cost. Here is a look at a high-value, highly engineered machining process for the Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.

  • Tool Considerations for High Speed Cutting

    Fast CNC processing and high-pressure coolant contribute to removing metal at dramatic rates. But what should a shop know about cutting tools in high speed machining?

  • Applying Turn-Milling

    Combining a rotating tool with rotating work produces a machining operation that is distinct from standard turning or milling.