7/29/2019

Schunk Kontec KSC Vise Optimized for Use with Palletized Automation

Originally titled 'Vise Optimized for Use with Palletized Automation'
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The Schunk Kontec KSC clamping vises are made for raw and finished part machining.

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Schunk’s Kontec KSC clamping vises are made for machining raw and finished parts, combining high clamping forces and short setup times. The KSC-F single-acting clamping vise, designed for automated machine loading, has a fixed jaw, with quick adjustment of the clamping range, the company says. A flat design and light weight are said to make the vise ideal for conditions requiring unattended workpiece handling on pallet systems.

The three sizes — KSC-F 80, KSC-F 125 and KSC-F 160 — are designed for  pallet sizes of 320 × 320 mm, 400 × 400 mm and 500 × 500 mm, respectively. Because of the 160-degree quick-clamping feature, workpieces can be clamped with a torque wrench, safely locking the vise. Clamping by tension means that the bending load at the base body is minimized, making the vises suitable for use with the Vero-S quick-change pallet system. With reversible jaws, the vise covers clamping ranges between 0 and 434 mm, depending on the unit size.

The vise is also available in with a base body length of 280 mm and with clamping forces ranging to 50 kN with encapsulated drive.

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