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6/27/2018

Series 320 Electronic Weld Head System Extends Force Range

Originally titled 'Electronic Weld Head System Extends Force Range'
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Amada Miyachi America Inc.’s update to its Series 320 electronic weld head system can do safety critical applications in the medical, aerospace, precision electronics and automotive markets.

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Amada Miyachi America Inc.’s update to its Series 320 electronic weld head system increases the maximum weld force to 7.0 lbs (3175 g) with a maximum follow up force of 7.75 lbs (3520 g). The system can do safety critical applications in the medical, aerospace, precision electronics and automotive markets.

With the expanded force range, it does fine wire welding like squib wires as well as hearing aid components, electronic components and implantable medical devices. The weld head system is designed to meet the process demands of microelectronics manufacturing and be robust enough to endure industrial environments. It can be configured with in-line or offset opposed electrodes to tailor the weld head for specific applications.

With accurate force and position parameters, the system can provide process control and measurement. The weld-to-displacement feature stops the weld during collapse.

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